Mission Statement

We believe in creating memorable, beautiful, fun games by engaging and delighting gamers worldwide. We hope that our games capture the imaginations of experienced gamers and new gamers alike. We also seek to add value to our fellow creators and backers in a way that extends beyond board games by sharing our crowdfunding and entrepreneurial successes, mistakes, and insights.

Stonemaier Games is based in St. Louis, Missouri (USA), and was founded in 2012 by Jamey Stegmaier and Alan Stone.

Guiding Principles

  • Personal attention to backers/fans: treat backers as people, not numbers
  • Make every game a unique, fun, engaging social experience
  • No exclusive content–we want to include people, not exclude them
  • Focus on strategy and event games, but open to other games
  • Extensive playtesting, both in person and blind
  • Top-notch graphic design and art
  • High-quality components
  • Mostly 2-6 player games (must play with 2 players [ideally even 1, though we can implement that]; must play at least 5 players, ideally 6)
  • Create stories and memorable moments through our games

12 Tenets of Board Game Design for Stonemaier Games

  1. Quick, streamlined setup with (at most) minimal pre-game choices.
  2. Ability to plan ahead before taking your turn (you shouldn’t have to wait for the previous player to complete their turn to be able to decide what you’re doing on your turn).
  3. Limited analysis paralysis with choices displayed on player mats, game board, etc. This also manifests in a reasonable amount of information on display, not dozens of cards and tiles with detailed text that players need to read from across the table.
  4. Tension, not hostility. We like to limit the potential for spite while still encouraging various forms of interaction.
  5. Interesting choices are better than luck. If there are elements of randomness, players should be able to make decisions based on random input (instead of, say, rolling dice to determine the outcome). Agency is very important; it means that players have control over their fate.
  6. Rewards and forward momentum, not punishment and backwards movement. Players should feel like they’ve progressed during the game to a superior position than at the beginning, and the mechanisms should support this (i.e., engine building).
  7. Very, very few rules exceptions.
  8. Strong connection between theme and mechanisms. Mechanisms should be designed to keep players immersed in the game instead of reminding them they’re playing a game. Two key examples of mechanisms that don’t do this are phases and action checklists. There are much better, thematic ways of showing players what they can do on their turn.
  9. Organic end-game trigger (we’re generally not drawn to games with a set number of rounds).
  10. Board games are tactile experiences. We love games with some type of appealing, exciting component. It can be as simply as the cardboard Tetris-style pieces in Patchwork or as complex (yet important) wheels in Tzolk’in.
  11. Variable factors to create replayability–you can’t play the same exact game twice, even if you try.
  12. Multiple paths to victory. Various game subsystems should be equal in their ability to reach the winning criteria.
© 2017 Stonemaier Games