Kickstarter Lesson #15: Finishing Touches: FAQ and Preview

26 February 2013 | 17 Comments

There’s a little quirk on Kickstarter that you won’t realize until you launch a project: You can’t write the FAQ in advance.

I understand the point of this–how do you know which questions are frequently asked if you haven’t yet launched a project on which people can ask questions? But you don’t need people to ask you questions to figure out what some of your FAQs are going to be. You can anticipate most of them.

Also, the FAQ is a great place to include information that some people–but not most people–are curious about. Thus it helps you keep your project page as short, sweet, and focused as possible.

The point of all this is that you should pre-write as much of your FAQ as possible in preparation of posting those questions and answers as soon as you launch your project. You might have to scramble to post them for a few minutes, but you definitely want them up as soon as possible.

***

So now you’re here. You’ve worked on every aspect and detail of your project page. Kickstarter approved it a long time ago as I recommended in one of the first Kickstarter lessons. You’re finally ready to launch…but there’s one more thing.

Send out your private preview link to 5-10 tech- and web-savvy friends. Give them a few days to reply. I guarantee they will catch things you missed or that you thought were obvious. You want these people to catch your mistakes, not the first few people to visit your project after it goes live.

(Update: Your project preview link will automatically forward to your actual project URL after you’ve launched.)

It’ll take a few days to compile feedback and make revisions, but then you’re finally ready to launch. Double check the Kickstarter Lesson on timing, and then a the right moment, press the Launch button that has been enticing you for the last few months. It’s go time.

Up Next: Kickstarter Lesson #16: Launch Day

Also read: Kickstarter Lesson #249: The Frequently Asked Questions to Answer in Your FAQ

17 Comments on “Kickstarter Lesson #15: Finishing Touches: FAQ and Preview

    1. Hi there

      >Send out your private preview link to 5-10 tech- and web-savvy friends. Give them a few days to reply. I guarantee they will catch things you missed or that you thought were obvious. You want these people to catch your mistakes, not the first few people to visit your project after it goes live.

      (Update: Your project preview link will automatically forward to your actual project URL after you’ve launched.)

      We are thinking the project to launch in Kickstarter.
      Before doing that, we would like to refer the preview link which someone else’s project
      is doing.

      The problem is that we do not have any friends who have the preview link or the going project in Kickstarter.

      Is it possible for us to refer someone else’s project?

      Impossible, we have no choice but giving it up. Possible, please show us the procedure so that we may go it over.

      1. omaruko: I think you’re asking if you can view the preview page of someone else’s project. The question is yes, but only if they share the link with you. So you need to contact the project creator and ask for the link.

        1. Thank you for your reply.

          There must be creators who want comments from not only friends, interested persons
          but also others.

          How to find creators who want to have wide range of comments?

          Such as twitter?

  1. James, this is really precious for any kickstarter campaign runner, especially me. I have found a great guy :) . Anyway, I already successfully run the first campaign (got $100k) and now ready to launch the second. The invention of mine called Able-HD, a portable HD monitor. When i’m ready, can I show it to you?

    1. I will!

      I will send you my next campaign link. After that, i hope that you can give a good comment/input on the kickstarter campaign page. Do you mind if I email you or something like PM. What’s your email?

  2. Jamey, I just wanted to say thank you for being so generous with sharing your experiences. I’m a filmmaker gearing up to launch my own Kickstarter in March, and was thrilled and RELIEVED to find your site two months ago. I’ve been reading every article carefully, and I’m taking all of your advice to heart. It’s pretty much like you’re right alongside me as I’m putting it together! – Laura Somers

    1. Thanks Laura! I admire the amount of time and research you’re putting into your project preparation. And congrats on starting a blog about it!

    1. Eyal: I think your Kickstarter page looks great, especially since it’s succinct and visual. Have you read my Kickstarter Lessons about stretch goals? I think they could be an asset to your project–rather than start with a 120-page book, why not start with an 80-page book at a lower cost (and a lower funding goal), and as you get more backers and more funding (in excess of your goal), increase the page count? I think that might increase your chances of success, especially given the high cost of the standard level ($50). I would suggest trying to get that down to $39.

      1. Are you kidding me Jamey. It’s been 10 minutes since I posted! No wonder you were so successful on Kickstarter. Thank you!!

        Great point about the pages and the cost. I thought about offering a stretch goal if we hit the funding and thought I could do so after the fact. Guess I need to go read your stretch goal section…

        I’ve had a hard enough time getting down to 100 images but a 108 page book might be a good start with a goal of pushing out to 120.

        The toughest aspect for me was the pricing. MSRP on the book will be $34.95. I tried to build in high value items to make that $50 level worthwhile. The one plus I have is that I have a very strong following in our town and we have a very, very strong love of this town among current and former residents. Many have been asking me for the book so I think/hope it will do well with the pent up desire for one. That goes to one of your main points of spending the time on a blog ahead of the project. I started mine in Aug 2008 and it has really taken off.

        Thanks again. I greatly appreciate the information you put together (which must have taken hours) and the immediate response with great advice.

        1. Eyal–No problem. I had a minute before I was running out (so I won’t be able to comment after this). But I will say that I offer our products for less than MSRP, not more. Read my lesson about the premium level. Based on that MSRP, I’d recommend having a basic level (just the book, no frills) and then the book with the frills. Also make sure you’re clear about shipping. You could offer local delivery for free to your local fans, but account for that when choosing the price you need people to pay for shipping. For example, if each book costs you $15 to make and you want to make $10 profit (these are made-up numbers), and you anticipate media mail costing about $5/book, then you would charge $30 for non-locals and $25 for locals. Those locals want to support you, and they can by upgrading your pledge. Your job is to get them in the door with a low, fair price. Good luck!

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